Take the Ethical Storytelling Pledge

Thanks to the digital age, we live in a new era of storytelling and fundraising.

Whether through blogs, emails, social media or video, using story to highlight an organization’s impact is an engaging way to invite people into the good work being done. From the complexities of social issues to the benefits and downsides of nuanced solutions, great stories not only inspire but educate. Yet, all too often, organizations view stories as merely a way to raise funds. This reduces stories to a mere transaction, when they are so much more.

Stories have the power to show someone a mirror-image of their best self. To encourage people to hold on when going through difficult times. And to inspire others to act. Stories change our world.

We are a community of practitioners engaging the messy yet beautiful conversation around storytelling in the social impact space. At Ethical Storytelling, we believe people’s stories are more than emotion-generating machines. That story consumers are more than guzzlers of emotion. And that stories should always be constituent first, donor second. We aspire to tell stories that are truthful, nuanced, educational and empowering. Not just for donors or for branding, but because stories shape our humanity and our world.

This pledge is an aim to focus on the HOW not only the WHAT of the stories we may encounter – but maybe should not always tell – in the work we do.

As storytellers and non-profit practitioners shaping the way the world sees people’s lives:

We pledge to:

 

  • Tell others’ stories the way we want our story told.
  • Always put people first.
  • Explain to constituents the purpose of the story, where it will be used and answer any questions they might have before photographing, filming or recording.
  • Find an able translator if we speak different languages.
  • Ask the constituent if they wish to be named or identified and act according to their wishes.
  • Use all images and messages with the full understanding, participation and permission of the constituent or the constituent’s legal guardian.
  • Uphold the dignity of our constituents through empowering imagery and messages that motivate engagement and inspire hope.
  • Truthfully represent a situation or story to educate our audiences of the realities, complexities and nuances of the issues we advocate for.
  • Not use images, footage or words that sensationalize or stereotype a person or a situation.
  • Ask for feedback from our constituents and incorporate this feedback into the final story.
  • Abide by international law, standards and protocols related to vulnerable persons, including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).
  • Listen to our constituents’ voices and respect their decisions, story and journey.
  • Hold a posture of humility and learning, recognizing that failures can be our biggest educators.
  • Seek advice if we question whether a particular story, message or image is not in alignment with ethical storytelling practices.
  • Not tell the story, despite the resources invested, when the story cannot be told with the integrity of this pledge.
  • Take ownership of our responsibility to uphold integrity in our storytelling and messaging.

As a community of nonprofit practitioners and storytellers we commit to learning from the past and integrating a new standard of storytelling as we journey together into the future.

Sign the pledge

I pledge to be a bridge builder, working to tell better stories that respect and honor all people involved.

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418 Laura M. United States Mukwashi Trust School
417 Michelle B. United States CAPTAIN CHS
416 Christine G. United States Kentucky Refugee Ministries
415 Patrick B. USA Self Employed
414 Holly N. US Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound
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409 Jessie B. United Kingdom Justice and Care
408 Holli H. United States
407 Talia B. United States
406 Rachel B. United States b|hive story collective
405 Violet S. United States Spring Branch Community Health Center
404 Rachel F. United States Bronfman Center
403 Bryan B. United States Northwest Justice Project
402 Ambere P. Canada ACT Alberta Action Coalition on Human Trafficking
401 Matt T. United States Flagship visuals
400 Chelsea B. United States City Net
399 Richard D. England Ideas Alliance CIC.
398 audrika c.
397 Syd B. Canada
396 Samantha B. Thailand For Freedom International.
395 Juan G. Mexico Promotora de Apoyo a la Juventud IAP
394 Kaysey C. United States Truancy Intervention Project Georgia
393 Erin N. United States Missoula Aging Services
392 Melodie A. United States Urban Ministry
391 Joshua H. United States My Friend's Place
390 Alex S. United States Breakthrough San Juan Capistrano
389 Robin C. United States Actuality Media
388 Maddie B. Canada For Freedom International
387 Cataryna G. United States University of Houston
386 Alessia P. Italy arpadoptic.com
385 Erin B. United States Funraise
384 Elizabeth T. usa
383 Virginia S. United States Southern Poverty Law Center
382 Patrick J. United States Loma Linda University Church
381 Renee H. Canada University of Calgary
380 Kailea F. United States Earth Is `Ohana
379 Michel H. United States Schoolbox
378 Gabriel D. United States Skoll Foundation | Outside Films
377 Sara W. Thailand Shear Love International
376 Marikathryn H. United States Adoption Choices of Northern California
375 Keith B. United States NoVo Foundation
374 Jesse C. US Treehouse
373 Amie N. United States Amara
372 Mary B. United States Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano
371 Laura A. Haiti SheltersInternationalDisasterResponse
370 Amy M. Haiti

Join our Ethical Storytelling 101 Workshop to hear from filmmaker Heidi Burkey, The Freedom Story President Rachel Goble & others as they lay a foundation for what it means to tell story ethically in our non-profits.